Thursday, January 21, 2010

2010 Notable Children's Books

I don't know about you but I'm always on the lookout for great children's books. My little guy (7 months) still mostly just wants to gnaw on the books at this point, but I still love reading to him. I really enjoy many of the stories myself. The Association for Library Service to Children just released their list of 2010 Notable Children's Books. The list is pretty long so I'm not posting it all but here are a few that I thought looked interesting. If any of you out there have read any of these, please let me know what you thought!

For young readers:

The Curious Garden. By Peter Brown.
Liam discovers a patch of lonely plants in an elevated train track and encourages them to grow into a magnificent garden that spreads throughout the drab city.











Red Sings from Treetops: A Year in Colors. By Joyce Sidman. Illus. by Pamela Zagarenski.
Evocative poems celebrate color and enliven the senses as readers follow a woman and her dog surrounded by myriad intricately costumed and stylized figures through the seasons. (A 2010 Caldecott Honor Book.)








A Book. Mordicai Gerstein. Illus. by the author.
Part of a family who live inside a book, a young girl travels through fairy tales, mysteries, adventure yarns, and historical novels in search of a story of her own.







For middle readers:


Where the Mountain Meets the Moon. By Grace Lin. Illus. by the author.
A young Chinese girl, long a believer in her father’s fantastic stories, goes on a quest to find the legendary Old Man of the Moon in the hope of bringing life to Fruitless Mountain. (A 2010 Newbery Honor Book.)









The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate. By Jacqueline Kelly.
Eleven-year-old Calpurnia Virginia Tate and her curmudgeony old grandfather bond over their interest in the evolution of the species on a Texas plantation at the turn of the last century. (A 2010 Newbery Honor Book.)










Anne Frank: her life in words and pictures from the archives of the Anne Frank House. By Menno Metselaar and Ruud van der Rol.
A visual companion to other accounts of Anne Frank’s life is told chiefly through photographs, many published nowhere else, and handwritten excerpts from her actual diary in a well-researched and powerful and compact package.

Click here for the complete list of Notable Children's Books. Enjoy reading!
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